*  Exported from  MasterCook  *
 
               NOT JUST FOR BREAKFAST: LIGHT PANCAKES & WAFF
 
 Recipe By     : 
 Serving Size  : 1    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Vegetarian
 
   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
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   Article by By Nanette Blanchard
   
   Most of the countries of the world serve some sort of
   pancake, from French crepes to Russian blini. Even
   waffles can either be Belgian or just plain American.
   Unfortunately, many waffle and pancake recipes are
   high in fat and really heavy. Is it possible to
   lighten up your morning pancakes? Yes, it is!
   
   Sourdough starters, yeast, and other leaveners like
   baking soda and baking powder are used in dairy-free
   pancakes and waffles. All these batters will improve
   after standing; so don't be afraid to cover and
   refrigerate overnight before cooking. Leftover
   pancakes and waffles freeze quite well. I use the
   microwave to heat up frozen pancakes, and I pop frozen
   waffles into the toaster to regain their nice crispy
   texture.
   
   Pancakes should be cooked on a hot griddle. One way to
   prepare pancakes for a large group of people at the
   same time is to use a large griddle or two or three
   nonstick skillets at once. I have a nice enameled cast
   iron griddle that fits over two range burners; so I
   can prepare about 8-10 pancakes at the same time. To
   keep pancakes warm until serving time, place on a
   platter covered with foil in a 200- degree oven.
   Waffles should be placed directly on your oven’s racks
   at 200 degrees to keep warm.
   
   All waffle irons are not created equal. I've tested
   several different models and found some are more
   nonstick than others. To prevent a sticky waffle
   disaster, pre-season your waffle iron each time you
   make a batch by brushing  with vegetable oil or
   spraying with vegetable cooking spray. Repeat this
   process if you notice the waffles beginning to stick.
   
   Whether you use your grandmother’s heavy old
   four-waffle baker or one of the new fancy-shaped
   nonstick models, you really don't need to use a lot of
   oil to cook waffles.  Some new waffle irons have a
   temperature setting which gives you more control over
   the waffle’s doneness. (All the waffles in this
   article were tested in Vitantonio’s Five-of-Hearts
   nonstick waffler.)
   
   This article originally appeared in the March/April,
   1994 issue of the _Vegetarian_Journal_, published by
   the Vegetarian Resource Group, PO Box 1463, Baltimore,
   MD 21203.
   
   From: bobbi@clark.net (Bobbi Pasternak).  rfvc Digest
   V94 Issue #204, Sept. 22, 1994. Formatted by Sue
   Smith, S.Smith34, TXFT40A@Prodigy.com using MMCONV.
  
 
 
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